Archive for July 4th, 2019

Independence Day

July 4, 2019

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Independence Day

By Dahni
© 2019, all rights reserved

Just 13 little colonies and about 13% of their population won independence for all

As we contemplate and ready ourselves for a four-day weekend, food, fun and frivolity with family and friends, consider HOW it is even possible! While our fledgling little Republic was in labor to be born, our founding mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, kinsmen (and kinswomen), and friends, were preparing for war that held only a fool’s hope of surviving and with far, far less of a fool’s hope that they would succeed! But they were committed to pledge their fortunes, their lives and their sacred honor, ONLY because, it was the right thing to do! Think about this the next time you don’t feel like doing right or can’t even imagine winning!

The original was dated for July 4th, 1776 as this was the date the wording was approved by the appropriate parties in Congress. It was signed, August 2nd.

On this Day in History-

July 4. 1776

In Philadelphia, Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence is adopted and approved by the appropriate parties.

Meanwhile, on Staten Island in New York, George Washington expresses dismay that many islanders are “too favourably disposed” to join the British.

And at Crown Point, NY, Dr. Bebe writes that “The Capts and Subs may generally be found at the grog shops, the soldiers either sleeping, swimming, fishing, or cursing and swearing most generally the Latter.”

But wait, what do I mean on July 4th, 1776, the ‘Declaration’ was “adopted” and “approved”? 

They decided to “Declare” Independence on July 2nd, 1776. But the American Revolution started in April, of 1775. And Jefferson wrote his first draft, in June, of 1776. The adopters and approvers never even signed it until August 2nd, 1776. It was not Delivered to Great Britain until, November of 1776. But we celebrate September 17 as the day our Constitution was signed. Why do we therefore, not celebrate August 2nd, as the date the Declaration was signed? 

OK, so what did happen on July 4th, 1776, with regards to the ‘Declaration’?

On July 4th, the Continental Congress approved of the final wording of the Declaration of Independence. The fancy copy (now displayed in the National Archives in Washington, D.C.), was made and included the date, July 4th, 1776. From this, copies were made (the Dunlop Broadsides), including the date 7/4/1776 and distributed throughout the colonies. General George Washington, commander of the Continental Army, had such a copy, read aloud to all his troops. 

A national holiday? Not even close! There were lots of problems and disagreements among our little O’ Republic, for many years, even after the war’s end and Independence was won, from Great Britain. The Democrat-Republican Party liked Jefferson and his Declaration and the Federalists thought it was too French and too anti-Great Britain. 

Even after the War of 1812, there was not much interest in the Declaration. What war? The war between the United States and The United Kingdom (Basically, Great Britain again). John Adams complained in a letter that our New America, was not much interested in our past. 

By the 1820’s and the 1830’s, the Federalists came apart and Jefferson’s Democrat-Republican Party emerged and new copies of the Declaration were printed. 

For many years, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams were bitter rivals and wouldn’t even speak to each other. But they reconciled and became great friends at the end. 

“Thomas Jefferson still survives.” These were the famous last words of America’s second president of the United States, John Adams. He died on July 4, 1826 at the age of 92, on the same day as Thomas Jefferson. Little did Adams realize that he had actually outlived his former rival who turned into great friend, by just a few hours.

Since both men died on the same day, July 4th, 1826, a renewed interest in our past and of the document, the Declaration of Independence was renewed. But not completely.

By the times of Abraham Lincoln, the Jefferson Democrat-Republican party had split into the two-party system we have before us today, continuing to divide us from one another. On April 6th, 1859, Lincoln sent a letter declining an invitation to attend the birthday celebration, honoring Thomas Edison, in Boston, MA

“All honor to Jefferson–to the man who, in the concrete pressure of a struggle for national independence by a single people, had the coolness, forecast, and capacity to introduce into a merely revolutionary document, an abstract truth, applicable to all men and all times, and so to embalm it there, that to-day, and in all coming days, it shall be a rebuke and a stumbling-block to the very harbingers of re-appearing tyranny and oppression.”

Your obedient Servant


A. Lincoln

 

Still, it was not until 1870, almost 100 years after the Declaration had been approved, and only 5 years after the American Civil War had ended that Congress passed legislation, making it a national holiday. But how it comes to us today, was not cemented until 1939 and further amended, in 1941. 

Amidst horrible and ill health, the loss of his beloved eldest daughter, whom had died in childbirth, Jefferson wept uncontrollably, in the next room. He was nearly broke and his family tried to shield him from the truth that he was about to lose his beloved Monticello. The era of the original founders was about to come crashing down. Still, the mayor of Washington, D.C., had big plans for the fourth in, 1826. The three surviving signers of the Declaration—Jefferson, John Adams and Charles Carroll, were all invited to attend as were former presidents—Madison and Monroe. All declined for the same reasons—poor health and old age. But Jefferson could not let this pass and was the last to respond and to decline the invitation. He mustered all of his last remaining strength and passion and brilliant wit, nearly equal to his early work of 1776, with his last known public letter, June 24th, 1826. What follows are excerpts of this letter, declining to attend in Washington, D.C., for July 4th, 1826.

“May it be to the world what I believe it will be, (to some parts sooner, to others later, but finally to all), the Signal of arousing men to burst the chains, under which Monkish ignorance and superstition had persuaded them to bind themselves, and to assume the blessings & security of self government. The form which we have substituted restores the free right to the unbounded exercise of reason and freedom of opinion.”

“All eyes are opened, or opening to the rights of man, the general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth that the mass of mankind has not been born, with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately by the grace of god. These are grounds of hope for others. For ourselves let the annual return of this day, for ever refresh our recollections of these rights and an undiminished devotion to them.”

Excerpts from: Thomas Jefferson’s (third president of the United States), last known public letter.

Jefferson’s visionary friend again and in death the same day, just hours apart, on July 4th, 1826, once wrote to his wife Abigail, how Independence Day should be remembered; how it should be celebrated. He wrote that the date-

“The second day of July, 1776, will be the most memorable epoca [Spanish for epoch]  in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival…with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forevermore. You will think me transported with enthusiasm, but I am not. I am well aware of the toil and blood and treasure it will cost us to maintain this Declaration and support and defend these States. Yet, through all the gloom I can see the rays of ravishing light and glory.”

John Adams, letter to wife Abigail, 1776 July 3rd, Philadelphia

In all manner of pomp and illuminations, let the banner unfurl in the winds of Liberty

I am not for changing the day of our Independence, certainly not, but neither am I for, forgetting these times and dates!

From all of this and so much more, even to the despair of having been born and to life itself, only roughly 13% of the population fought in the American Revolution and of those that survived and endured, some went on to defeat the greatest military force in the world 🌍 in its day and secured the blessings of Liberty to themselves and their posterity; their progeny, be it by DNA or free choice (you and I). 

Do not so freely abandon these lessons of Liberty! Be ever mindful of them and never relinquish the vigilance necessary, to keep them! 

HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY! May God bless you and may God continue to bless, The United States 🇺🇸 of America!

Your devoted and co-equal compatriot,

Dahni

Free to reason, Free to opine and Free to Choose Liberty

From a work in progress: ‘Apple of Gold in a Picture of Silver’ a sequel to ‘Reset’ “An Un-alien’s Guide to Resetting Our Republic”, by the same author

Whereas the Declaration of Independence is the Apple of Gold, ensconced, secured and protected within the Constitution, the Picture of Silver, WE the People are also, The Apple of Gold! Image © 2016 by Dahni & I-Magine, all rights reserved 

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