Archive for the ‘Portrait of an American’ Category

My Washington

July 20, 2018

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By Dahni
© 2018, all rights reserved

Not palatial towers
Etchings or engravings
Bronze or marble statues, marble or granite monuments
Gold and gilded
Not tapestries or fine oil paintings
Not the US Capitol
Not the White House
Not the US Supreme Court
Not the Ladies, Columbia, Liberty or Justice
Not ancient histories
Not current and 200 and more years of history
Not the thinker, Benjamin Franklin
Not the eloquent writer, Thomas Jefferson
Not the Statesman, John Adams
Not Thomas Payne
Not Patrick Henry
Not Betsy Ross or all the GREAT women that
made it possible
Not Paul Revere or John Hancock
Not the father of the Constitution,
James Madison
Not the National Archives which hold the
original works of an iron pen:

The Declaration of Independence
The Articles of Confederation
The United States Constitution

Not the Republic on which it still stands
Not the Flag or National Anthem
Not the highly educated or the elite
Not those particularly eloquent
Not the greatest general or tactician

But unlike all the rest and those above and even though many pledged their lives, their fortunes and sacred honor, most went home to their families and lives. My Washington did not!

He reluctantly accepted his call to command the Continental Army, with the caveat that he was most probably, not the best person for the task.

He thought often, that he would die in battle, be captured and executed for treason against the king of England. He also thought he would likely lose his beloved estate at Mt. Vernon, confiscated by England. His greatest fear was to fail! Yet despite all these realistic, plausible and possible consequences, he wrote often in his journal and capitalized the word, the Cause, was worth all!

He did not lose his life, but was constantly aware that at any moment, a single bullet could end his life just as easily as those he saw die, right next to him. In one single battle, he had two horses shot out from under him and at the end of the same battle, he had four holes in his coat, where bullets had passed through and yet he was unharmed. He used the word “providence” and believed in it. Today, many use this word and think its meaning is, is being. fortunate or having good luck. But in his day, My Washington understood it to mean, “in the presence of God”! His often escaping unharmed, strengthened his belief that his life was being spared, for some greater purpose.

He did not lose his beloved Mt. Vernon, but it would be almost 16 years before he could spend much time there.

He was not a brilliant tactician nor infallible. He failed often. His troops were composed of ignorant, unlearned, inexperienced, ill-equipped, and undisciplined non-soldiers. Many poor, drunks, and slaves, mostly the “deplorables” of Virginia and others, from the other 12, rag-tag colonies, were his troops. These were the core, of the Cause!

He was defeated in New York, and lost the city of New York. He lost Philadelphia. Of all those killed under his command, many more would defect. Defeated and outnumbered, the British army only had to follow their blood trail, left in the snow by bloody footprints of feet without shoes or boots, but wrapped in rags, to have ended the revolutionary war completely! But in their arrogance, the British did not follow.

His remaining troops wintered in Valley Forge, PA, for My Washington believed it important, to keep a watchful eye on the city, where the Cause began, in the writing of, The Declaration of Independence. More would defect for fear, from a defeated and hopeless attitude and for it being long since they were paid, the promises made to them. Of those that remained, half would die to dysentery, starvation, frostbite, and small pox. Most lived in makeshift cold and drafty huts with little heat and nare’ a man could even stand up inside.

My Washington separated the cooking areas from the waste areas and moved them to the opposite ends of the camp, in hopes of improving sanitation and lesson the death toll. On advice of a slave, for the first time in recorded history, he purposely infected the remainder of his troops with “live pox” from those already infected with and dying from small pox. He himself had contracted small pox in his youth and unlike most infected, had survived, but the consequences plagued him, for the rest of his life. The mass inoculation saved the lives of his last living troops. These were the core of the core of the Cause!

Benjamin Franklin was in Europe trying to persuade the French to help and provide the Cause with a navy, which the Cause did not have. They were reluctant to come to their aid unless, there was some demonstrative evidence of potential victory. Still, Franklin tried to assist My Washington from afar and kept sending him anyone, the most unlikely persons, from the most unlikely places. One was a foreign general that came to Valley Forge and trained My Washington’s troops, to shoot, to march and become disciplined, all winter long. Many of the British army thought it incredulous and incredible that at the end, these were the same men they had easily defeated and demoralized in New York and Philadelphia.

My Washington knew his troops, inferior in number and experience stood no chance whatsoever, standing face to face with the greatest military force on earth. Instead, he relied on cunning, providence (in the presence of God), and nature (cover of cloud, darkness, fog, rain and snow), to go where and when, none would dare to go or be so foolish to go. He relied on his understanding of the land, gained from his experience as a surveyor. He knew the land and he knew the British did not. Instead of facing the redcoats in direct battle, his troops would fire on the British from afar and even their officers or capture their commanders. This was uncivil to the British in their rules of engagement. And then these uncivil cowards would retreat to the cover of the woods and the land, the Cause knew full well. But they would live to fight another day!

He relied on innovation, long rifles that could fire further and with greater accuracy than their foe.

He relied upon invisible ink and a network of spies and informants and signals from men and women and children, often with such codes employed as which side of the clothesline, the women would hang their laundry from.

He relied on barmaids and seductnrices to glean important information from their unsuspecting enemies.

He relied on a system of communication that Benjamin Franklin had set up, which would become, the U.S. Mail. He relied on a system of riders that rode long distances, changing horses frequently. This system of quick communication would become, the Pony Express.

He relied on guerrilla warfare, much learned from the American general and politician, Christopher Gadsden, the father of the U.S. Marines. Gadsden designed a flag with a yellow field depicting a rattlesnake coiled and ready to strike. Each coil represented each of the 13 colonies representing the Cause. Positioned below the rattlesnake are the words, “DONT TREAD ON ME.”

Yes, My Washington relied on guerrilla warfare, learned from Francis Marion, the ‘Swamp Fox’ of South Carolina.

He relied on ‘shock and awe’, deception and purposefully leaked false information to confuse and deceive their opponents, who often thought they were surrounded by far superior numbers, when only a handful of men shot from the woods, lit torches and shouted wildly, loudly, hysterically, insanely, ominously, ferociously and furiously! These measures often caused chaos, fear and trembling to the greatest and most disciplined army on earth so much so, they would throw down their arms and run away.

My Washington and his troops survived on little pay, food, and equipment often from few sources such as, every penny earned from his world popular and successfully frequently reprinted work, ‘Common Sense’, by Thomas Payne.

My Washington relied upon such works and heart pounding calls for the Cause as, Patrick Henry’s speech and concluding words, “Give me Liberty or give me death!” My Washington relied upon as did the Cause, on memory. Henry’s speech was delivered unwritten and without notes. The only reason that the Cause could hold them and WE it’s recipients of today can read them or hear them, know them and honor and follow them is because, Patrick Henry was asked for the words and he, having a photographic memory, delivered them verbatim and they were written down for posterity and our progeny, the future core of the core of, the Cause!

He relied upon motivation. He spoke with his men frequently. He walked among them. He lived among them. He fought with them not from the rear, but led them from the front and fought side by side with them. Only his personal slave and friend believed he was too important to the Cause to be killed and to his often displeasure, his friend and slave through the entire war, would place himself in front of My Washington, in harm’s way. Neither man would lose their lives, during the full course of the Cause! He had many works read to his troops, the entirety of the Declaration of Independence, from a copy, right after its publication. He had read to his men, other speeches, plays and other works to inspire his army that there was no greater cause to live for, lose all for, to hope for and even die for than, the Cause!

His new successes compelled the French to aid the Cause and to send troops and a navy armada. The French troops helped to secure victory at Yorktown, and if not for the French and their Navy, the Cause could never have been and would not have been realized!

All of these things heretofore could speak of blind or just dumb luck. Those then and now which do not believe in providence (standing in the presence of God), have no other choice than to accept luck as the reason, for the success of the Cause, but luck was not ever then; not now nor ever, a logical explanation, for the impossible to have been not only possible, but a reality of the miraculous!

My Washington relied on appearance, not to deceive or for appearance sake. As a child, he memorized hundreds of rules for civility. He knew how to dress, how to walk and how to speak; how to enter a room and how to leave it. He knew as a tall man (at least 6’ tall), he stood head and shoulders above most. He used his stature to command the appearance of strength, but also, for modesty, reverence, respect and humility.

Having completed his task, the Cause having succeeded, he was in route to the Continental Congress that was then residing in Maryland. Scores of people, men, women and children came out to meet and greet him, enthusiastically shouting, calling out his name and with hopes of shaking his hand or just touching him. He could have easily become king. The position was suggested to him numerous times and he always adamantly refused! He did not believe replacing one ruthless tyrant king with another benevolent one, was worthy of, the Cause!

But he gave an emotional speech, surrendered his commission as Commander and Chief, bowed to the Congress, turned and walked out of the room.

This was his intentional purpose to not only give up his commission, but to retire from public life and be content with living under the laws of the Congress, as a private citizen, for the remainder of his life. This final act was announced ahead of time. Even the king of England after having signed the Peace Treaty, knew of this. What person of power gives up power? The king said, “If he (Washington), “does this, he is the greatest man in the world!” My Washington did and he perhaps was, among the greatest persons in the entire history of the world?! His admiration and popularity would not and could not keep him private for long.

He said the Articles of Confederation (1777), was “nugatory”, of little or no consequence; trifling, inconsequential, too nugatory to merit attention! He was obviously correct. In 1787, he reluctantly agreed to preside over the Constitutional Congress which resulted in, The Constitution of the United States of America, In 1789.

He was called and once again, reluctantly agreed to be OUR first president. Relying upon appearance, he guided the establishment of the three branches of government and how they were to operate as co-equals, but servants to the People. He abhorred, despised, and had contempt for all political parties, whose lust for power were divisive over differences, rather than unifying over all we hold in common and were essential in the success of the Cause and its continuance, in OUR future as a republic.

He served only two terms, when he could have had a lifetime appointment. His views as limiting government was wholly against lifetime appointments, including, the interpreted clause in the Constitution, for the Supreme Court judges.

After eight years as years in war, as commander and chief and eight years as president, he finally went home to his beloved Mt. Vernon, as a private citizen. He oversaw every detail of his estate and often rode all over it on horseback. His inheritance from his father had made him comfortable, but he built his estate by his own means. Except for the current occupier of the White House, no other president has been as wealthy during war, after war and especially during their presidencies or after their terms. But the Cause was worth more to him than his own life, honor, wealth or success.

One morning, he went out for a ride and it was raining. When he returned home his clothes were soaked. Mt. Vernon had guests and not wanting them to wait for his presence any further, he did not change his clothes. After all the guests had been sufficiently greeted, ‘wined and dined’, entertained and given fond farewell by he and his beloved wife Martha, he retired to bed, complaining of a chill. He later developed a fever. There was nothing anyone could do. He was dying and he knew it. Likely having a will prepared long before or at least when he commanded the Continental Army, he called for it and a second will to be brought to him on his death-bed. Who knows when his second Last Will and Testament had been prepared? He ordered the first to be burnt in the fire in his room before him. No one will ever know the contents of that will. His second will would be executed and among all of its contents and provisions, every slave on the estate of Mt. Vernon was FREED! This last act was in compliance with his belief in, the Cause.

He died.

His beloved wife Martha, burned all their many letters and correspondence between them over their many years as a devoted and passionate couple that were friends and confidants. They kept their private lives separate from their public duties.

My Washington passed away on December 14, 1799. It would be 63 years before the Emancipation Proclamation on September 22, 1862, during the Civil War (so-called), when slavery was predominate in the South, when Abraham Lincoln freed the slaves. It would take 65 years until the 13th Amendment, abolishing slavery and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime, was abolished and was adopted, December 18, 1865. It would take a 165 years and several wars before The Civil Rights Act, enforcing the Constitutional right to vote, equal opportunity and other non-discriminatory purposes, was signed into law by then president, Lyndon Johnson, on July 2nd, 1964. My Washington on his death-bed, freed his slaves and in retrospect, his act was prophetic of things to come, though long in their coming.

My Washington is no city that bears his name where much of his legacy could be considered corrupt, a ‘swamp’, “the deep state”, a shadow government; a cesspool and all in his name and image.

My Washington is not the legacy of all the work he tried and accomplished and left to US, the Republic of, the Cause.

My Washington is the First American of the United States, the Father of Our Republic, OUR First president, and WE the People are his legacy. WE are his children; his progeny, the children of, the Cause.

But more than all of this, My Washington is my example that to this Republic, there is no greater cause than, the Cause. That to keep and protect and defend Life, Liberty and The Pursuit of Happiness, is always worth any pledge of life, fortune and sacred honor.

My Washington – February 11, 1731 – December 14, 1799

1 of WE,

Dahni

No PC just CS

June 17, 2016
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By Dahni
© 2016, all rights reserved

“These are the times that try men’s [and women’s] souls.”

Thomas Paine

NoPC1No PC just CS Here?

The first image, a red circle with a red angled line is a familiar visual word meaning, “not” or simply, “NO.” The letters PC could have different meanings, but here its meaning is, Political Correctness (PC).

I have become weary in bending my ears and having to hear it. My eyes have lost their focus and left them cloudy and bleary and hazy and teary-eyed, to have had to look upon it. My lips have become locked to speak of it ever again. Instead, I will return to CS which is, Common Sense. If you need to know what this is, there is the likelihood that you may not have any or political correctness (PC) has driven it far from memory? If I could teach it I would. I know no other way to define it or to share with others how it could possibly be imparted, than by what was written, well over 200 years ago.

NoPC2

Although this was originally published anonymously and first on January 10, 1776, it is no less relevant today, June 17th, 2016, 241 years later. It is almost prophetic in light or in the darkness of our present situation. It was originally titled ‘The Plain Truth,’ but was changed to ‘Common Sense’ and was written in the simple language understood by anyone and especially common folk. It was first published as just a 48 page pamphlet, but it went through many editions and was probably purchased or gifted and read by nearly 20,000,000 (TWENTY MILLION) people in its day. That is saying a lot, considering that the population in the original 13 colonies was only around, 2,500,000 when it was written. For comparison, multiply these numbers by a factor of 10, then do it again. This would be almost 2 billion copies read in a population of the USA at 250,000,000. But really, we are over 300 million.

What is really significant about this book besides its commonality with our present day, the very words were considered seditious and if the author was discovered (now we know it was Thomas Paine), he would have been hung as a traitor to England. The popularity of his work could have made him a tidy sum in his times, but he donated every penny to George Washington and the cause of Liberty. Just forty-eight pages was in essence, the call to revolution for liberty!

If like me, you feel immersed in, drowning in filth and stuck in diseased and life robbing muck of political correctness that is promoted by over-educated idiots that say-nothing and do-less, that cannot discern the difference between a fact and an opinion, I highly recommend reading, ‘Common Sense.’ If you would just like to know what common sense is, to recall it or just be healed by it, I greatly suggest you saturate yourself inside-out with it by reading, ‘Common Sense.’ I am almost nearly 100% sure that if you just had a printed copy lying unread, but in close proximity to you, you might get healed by absorption or as if by osmosis! I will in conclusion to this post, provide you with links whereby you can read it for yourself and/or download it to be viewed on your computers, laptops and/or other digital devices, at your convenience and OFTEN and to share it OFTEN!

 

My suggestions for reading ‘Common Sense’:

Get a good unabridged dictionary and keep it close by. An unabridged dictionary will show origins of words and perhaps explain words as used in the day of its writing that may be unfamiliar to you. And of course, it will define words you may not know. It is interesting to note from the language that if it was common in that day, many of us might think it above our current level of education? We have certainly dumbed down in many ways since 1776.

Read ‘Common Sense’ as if it were being written today, in the time in which we live. Change words as England with perhaps, the United States. Replace the word ‘king’ with say, the executive, legislative and judicial branches of government locally, state-wide or the federal government. Change names to people living presently.

If you will read ‘Common Sense’ as if it were written in 2016, you will be amazed how it speaks to you, to me, to US, WE the People living now.

 

The Present Truth:

We do not have a king in title ruling us, but political correctness has divided us, government has and is dividing us; the media is; education or the lack thereof is dividing us. Politics divide us. Money out of your pocket into that of others with or without our consent divides us. We are divided from one another, from our friends and even our own families. This is the exact opposite of our founding, our purpose as a republic with a constitution written to preserve and protect our unalienable rights as penned in the Declaration of Independence, in 1776. We revolted against tyranny of the day and secured the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, NOT because we were divided, but because WE the People, were— UNITED!!!

Today, we are ripe for a takeover, not merely from some visible external force, but our enemy comes to us from the outside and are among us. The enemy within and the enemy without, have ideologies which are absolutely contradictory to our Constitution as ours is, to theirs. There are only two choices. They either assimilate with ours or we must assimilate with theirs. There is NO other way for the Republic of, by and for the people to remain. If you do not understand this, you have no common sense and are as Joseph Stalin said, “useful parrots,” to the divided-falls-for-everything!

It was Thomas Paine in ‘Common Sense,’ that wrote, “government is, a necessary evil.” Yes, it is necessary, but do NOT for a moment forget that it is EVIL.” It is NOT our friend, our savior, it is force. In the name of division and political correctness, this force which was purposefully limited has because of its nature of EVIL, divided us and deprived us of our unalienable rights such as: Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness. Little by little our freedoms have eroded and continue to erode, amassing the power of WE in the name of some national security or some national crisis into the power and control and redistribution of, by and for the few!

If John Dickinson was the pen of the revolution see: http://wp.me/pGfx1-wy, Mercy Otis the Conscience see: http://wp.me/pGfx1-x0, Thomas Jefferson was the writer declaring our Independence, Thomas Paine with ‘Common Sense’ was the case for liberty. and Patrick Henry was the shout, heard all around the world—

“Give me Liberty or give me death.”

 

Yes, as Paine wrote, “These are the times that try men’s [and women’s] souls.” But for me, I will no longer accept this or political in-correctness. Un-friend me, do not follow me or subscribe to my posts. Divorce me, ban me from your home, kick me out of even my own family if you must. Disavow me and do not allow comments from me, if you deem this necessary. I am weary of dividing and political correctness! If you have no ‘Common Sense’ or refuse to even read ‘Common Sense,’ as linked and provided to you below FREE of Charge, by the way, then depart from me and I will from you! If departing it must be, I would you peace and clarity. I will count you as a brother or a sister. I hold onto hope that one day we could be friends and family. If we are not united, then we are divided, and if we are divided, then I must count you as mine enemy, though it be intentional or not. I am no soldier. I am no eloquent speaker or succinct, clear and popular author. I have no great sphere of influence, no wealth, no sacred honor to pledge, or life that may seem to matter much, but I matter because, I exist. But I can with equal resolve as any and by ‘Common Sense,’ yell to my dying breath just as Henry did, “Give me Liberty or give me death.” I am just me, but I am—

1 of WE,

Dahni

 

NOTES:

The original publication of Common Sense consisted of approximately 48 pages

Thomas Paine began work on Common Sense in late 1775 under the working title of Plain Truth. With the help of Benjamin Rush, who suggested the title Common Sense and helped edit and publish, Paine developed his ideas into a forty-eight page pamphlet. Paine published Common Sense anonymously because of its treasonous content.

Printed and sold by R. Bell, Third Street, Philadelphia, it sold as many as 120,000 copies in the first three months, 500,000 in the first year, and went through twenty-five editions in the first year alone. This would be roughly 20,000,000 million copies being sold today on Amazon dot com.

It was first published anonymously on January 10, 1776, during the American Revolution. Common Sense, signed “Written by an Englishman”, became an immediate success.[1]

In relation to the population of the Colonies at that time, it had the largest sale and circulation of any book in American history. Common Sense presented the American colonists with an argument for freedom from British rule at a time when the question of independence was still undecided.

Paine wrote and reasoned in a style that common people understood; forgoing the philosophy and Latin references used by Enlightenment era writers, Paine structured Common Sense like a sermon and relied on Biblical references to make his case to the people.[2]

Historian Gordon S. Wood described Common Sense as, “the most incendiary and popular pamphlet of the entire revolutionary era.” [3]
Paine donated his royalties from Common Sense to George Washington’s Continental Army, saying:

“As my wish was to serve an oppressed people, and assist in a just and good cause, I conceived that the honor of it would be promoted by my declining to make even the usual profits of an author.”

Thomas Paine

[1] Introduction to Rights of Man, Howard Fast, 1961
[2] Gordon Wood, The American Revolution: A History (New York: Modern Library, 2002), 55-56.
[3] Wood, American Revolution, 55

Links to ‘Common Sense (the full text):

https://www.gutenberg.org/files/147/147-h/147-h.htm
http://www.ushistory.org/paine/commonsense/
http://www.calhum.org/files/uploads/program_related/TD-Thomas-Paine-Common-Sense.pdf
https://legacy.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/paine-common.asp
http://www.pagebypagebooks.com/Thomas_Paine/Common_Sense/

From the Conscience of America

June 15, 2016
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By Dahni
© 2016, all rights reserved

MercyOwenWarren_smIn John Dickinson was the “penman” of the American Revolution (and he was) see: http://wp.me/pGfx1-wy, Mercy Otis Warren was the “Conscience of the American Revolution,”

Mercy Otis Warren accomplished things unknown to women in her time. She was a prolific and influential writer, the first woman playwright, wrote the first history of the American Revolutionary War (by a man or a woman), and influenced most of our founders, as well as speaking up for women’s rights.

John Adams, later the second president of the United States, once told Mercy’s husband in a letter:

“Tell your wife that God Almighty has entrusted her with the Powers for the good of the World, which … he bestows on few of the human race. That instead of being a fault to use them, it would be criminal to neglect them.”

(Schweitzer, Ivy. The Heath Anthology of American Literature. Fifth ed. CENGAGE Learning. Lauter, Paul ed. 2 Apr. 2011.)

She counted both John and Abigail Adams among her friends, and she influenced such great names as George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Samuel Adams, John Hancock, and Patrick Henry.

Mercy never had a formal education, like many girls of her time. For the most part, only boys received a thorough education, though she was allowed to sit in some of her older brother’s classes with a tutor. The Rev. Jonathon Russell, however, the minister of the local parish, took pity on her and supplied her with both books and counsel.

As she became older, it was her brother, James Otis, who became her companion in literary pursuits. It is he who is rumored to have said, “Taxation without representation is tyranny.”

When her husband realized she could speak more clearly than he ever could, he encouraged her to write about her convictions. James Warren affectionately dubbed his wife his “scribbler.” Together, they helped motivate the patriots to freedom. Their house even became a meeting place for the Sons of Liberty.

In 1774, she described the American situation as follows:

“America stands armed with resolution and virtue; but she still recoils at the idea of drawing the sword against the nation from whence she derived her origin. Yet Britain, like an unnatural parent, is ready to plunge her dagger into the bosom of her affectionate offspring. But may we not hope for more lenient measures!”

Mercy Otis Warren

“Our situation is truly delicate & critical. On the one hand we are in need of a strong federal government founded on principles that will support the prosperity & union of the colonies. On the other we have struggled for liberty & made costly sacrifices at her shrine and there are still many among us who revere her name too much to relinquish (beyond a certain medium) the rights of man for the dignity of government.”

Mercy Otis Warren

“I have my fears. Yet, notwithstanding the complicated difficulties that rise before us, there is no receding; and I should blush if in any instance the weak passions of my sex should damp the fortitude, the patriotism, and the manly resolution of yours. May nothing ever check that glorious spirit of freedom which inspires the patriot in the cabinet, and the hero in the field, with courage to maintain their righteous cause, and to endeavor to transmit the claim to posterity, even if they must seal the rich conveyance to their children with their own blood.”

Mercy Otis Warren

Mercy Otis Warren was a woman on fire for what she held dearly. If she wasn’t able to speak her opinions, she wrote them down. Her writings contained her beliefs, thoughts, and opinions about wars and political issues.

She wrote her last book, History of the Rise, Progress, and Termination of the American Revolution, in 1805. President Jefferson ordered advance copies for himself and every cabinet member in the White House.

Mercy Otis Warren died on October 19, 1814. The cause of death is unknown. She was 86 years old. She was buried at Old Burial Hill in Plymouth, Massachusetts beside her husband, James Warren, who had died in 1808. In her honor a warship which fought in World War II was called the SS Mercy Warren.

Mercy was inducted into the Woman’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls, New York in 2002. The legacy she left behind is amazing.

“Seldom has one woman in any age, acquired such an ascendancy over the strongest, by the mere force of a powerful intellect. She is said to have supplied political parties with their arguments; and she was the first of her sex in America who taught the reading world in matters of state policy and history. (Ellet, Elizabeth. “Mercy Warren.”

“The Women of the American Revolution. Three Rivers. Accessed 2 Apr. 2011.)

Mercy Otis Warren’s life encourages women to speak up. Mercy’s example can be followed in many ways. She spoke up when she needed to, and everyone benefited from the things she said. She was inspirational and worth remembering as a builder of our nation.

With all due respect to first lady Martha Washington, wife of George, our first president, who was the very first woman ever honored on our paper currency, on a silver dollar certificate in the late 19th century, it should have been the first lady of the Revolution, the Conscience of America, Mercy Otis Warren!

With all due respect to Harriet Tubman, an anti-slavery icon, whose image is to replace Andrew Jackson on the twenty-dollar bill, it should have been to honor, the Conscience of America, and voice against slavery many year her prior, Mercy Otis Warren!

With all due respect to Susan B. Anthony, Frederick Douglas, the Seneca Falls (NY) convention, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Carrie Chapman Catt, Lucretia Mott, Woman’s Suffrage, Women’s Rights and the right for women to vote, the first champion that should have been honored was, the Conscience of America, Mercy Otis Warren!

With all due respect to many women, the first woman to ever be a nominee for president or to become the first woman president should have been, the Conscience of America, Mercy Otis Warren!

 

1 of WE,

Dahni

From the Pen of the Revolution

June 8, 2016
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By Dahni
© 2016, all rights reserved

 

PenofRevolutio2John Dickinson, often referred to as the “penman of the Revolution,” was an American statesman, and a delegate to the Continental Congress. During the Second Continental Congress, there was high tension among the delegates and intense debate over revolution, but Dickinson refused to vote for or sign the Declaration of Independence, saying the emerging nation was not ready for open revolt against the most powerful empire on earth. In the end, he abstained from voting so that the overall tally for independence would be unanimous. He supported the revolution in many other ways and even in battle. He was one of the writers of the Articles of Confederation. Dickinson also helped draft the U.S. Constitution. He was born in 1732 and won fame in 1767, as the author of, ‘Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania,’ his Pennsylvania Chronicle, a series of 12 essays.

Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania,’ by John Dickinson

Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania,’ by John Dickinson

“If Parliament may lawfully deprive New York of any, of HER rights, it may deprive all the other colonies of THEIR rights. And nothing can possibly encourage such attempts, as a mutual inattention to the interests of each other. To divide, and thus to destroy, is the first political maxim in attacking those, who are powerful by their union.”

John Dickinson

Indeed, United WE stand, but divided WE fall!

PenofRevolution3

Insert on cover of: ‘Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania,’ by John Dickinson

Think of John Dickinson, the next time you read or think about the 10th Amendment to the United States Constitution!

“The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.”

Amendment X

1 of WE,

Dahni

#Portrait of an American

March 15, 2015

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By Dahni © 2015, all rights reserved

 

From time to time, we all have searched, for pictures to see what something or someone looks like. It is said:

 

“A Picture is worth a 1,000 words”

PortraitOfAnAmerican2

a picture of a 1,000 words

 

“The expression “Use a picture. It’s worth a thousand words.” appears in a 1911 newspaper article, quoting newspaper editor, Arthur Brisbane, discussing journalism and publicity.”

“In a 1913 newspaper advertisement, a similar phrase, “One Look Is Worth A Thousand Words”, appears, for the Piqua Auto Supply House of Piqua, Ohio.”

PortraitOfAnAmerican

 

“An early use of the exact phrase appears in an 1918 newspaper advertisement, for the San Antonio Light, which says:”

 

“One of the Nation’s Greatest Editors Says:

One Picture is Worth a Thousand Words
The San Antonio Light’s Pictorial Magazine of the War
Exemplifies the truth of the above statement—judging from the warm reception it has received at the hands of the Sunday Light readers.”

Source for the above quotes and image is, Wikipedia. The key words: ‘A Picture is worth a 1,000 words’

 

OK, I think we have the picture now. 🙂

But what does a – ‘Portrait of an American’ look like?

I ‘Googled,’ ‘Yahoo-ed’ and ‘Bing-ed,’ with these words – ‘Portrait of an American’ and chose ‘images.’ I invite you to do the same, right now and return to this post and continue reading to follow. I’ll wait. 🙂

If you did perform a search, from the three main search engines that most people use, there were some surprises, at least for me. The first bunch of images from Google was, the same album cover, for Marilyn Manson. That’s NOT quite, what I was expecting to find. 🙂

Yahoo and Bing, both returned similar results and were each a little different than Google, but still, NOT what I was looking for.

Well, what does an American look like?

We know that the word “American” can mean the Americas and include any place or anyone in North America, Mexico, Central America and South America. But we here in the USA, think of the word “American” as US, WE the People of, the United States. We are like the independence-glue, for not just the Americas, but the entire world!

We know that the one thing that has made us prosperous and has enabled our independent greatness is, our unalienable rights are written into the government of, by, and for the people. We know that everyone in the world has these same rights, but in the United States, they are written!

We know that our legal system does NOT recognize, The Declaration of Independence or the Preamble to the Constitution of the United States, in ANY court of law. But the Preamble to the Constitution is, the independence-glue, for all our rights, fought for in the American Revolution (Declaration of Independence) and all our rights and freedoms in, The Bill of Rights and The Constitution of the United States of America.

We know that this country is made up of, many people, from many races, skin color, cultures and beliefs, skills, abilities, talents and potential.

We know that this country started with the basic principles found in, our Declaration of Independence in 1776. We know that “ALL are created equal,” and that “we are endowed by our creator with certain unalienable rights that among these are Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness.”

We know that we won this beautiful and precious independence by the pledging of our fore-family’s Lives, Fortunes and Sacred Honor.

We know, we formed a government and powered it to preserve and protect our individual rights and freedoms.

We know that this nation and all that we have, individually and collectively was, and still is, based on unity, unity of purpose. And we know our great motto from Latin is:

 

‘E pluribus unum,’

“one out of many.”

 

We have seen and heard of and many believe in, a very different ‘Portrait of an American.’ Many believe that our government must provide every individual with their every need met and almost every conceivable or imaginable happiness. There are many in government that believe it is their right and responsibility, to provide these for all. Our elected servants have come out from among US, WE the People. If this is what our servants believe, what do we believe? WE are ALL in need of, a greater understanding of the true – ‘Portrait of an American!’

The Declaration of Independence listed three of our unalienable rights and one is, the right to, “the Pursuit of Happiness.” In our Bill of Rights, part of Our Constitution, two rights are listed, just like The Declaration of Independence – “Life” and “Liberty.” But one word in the Bill of Rights replaces “the Pursuit of Happiness.” It is the single or individual word, “property.” Property is, the result of, the pursuit of happiness! Property is, the result of having Life and the Liberty, to pursue happiness. This happiness or property is, based on one’s own individual efforts, talents, skills and abilities. But these would NOT be possible, without Life and Liberty!

So, if we each are responsible to pursue our own happiness and to acquire our own property, what then is, a ‘Portrait of an American?’ What does just one of, We the People look like?

To return to a picture being worth a 1,000 words, I will share the following video, to answer and show this picture.

Most television programs are filmed in a ratio of about 30 frames, for one second of video. If a picture is worth a 1,000 words, the following 3:58 (three minutes and fifty eight seconds) edited video clip would be about:

3:58 = 238 seconds X 30 frames per second = 7,140 frames or single pictures.

7,140 pictures X each picture being worth a 1,000 words = 7,140,000 words.

If a book had about 400 pages, which is approximately 100,000 words, 7,140,000 words would be about 71, four hundred page books.

The following short video, speaks volumes to me! It contains thousands of images and are equal to millions of words to me! It is a gorgeous, “Portrait of an American!’

 

Lisa Nichols – ‘Portrait of an American’

 

In the video above, there are two things that Lisa Nichols did NOT do, in telling her story:

  1. She did not blame anyone, that she was “broke and broken”
  2. She did not expect the government or anyone to provide, for her needs or her happiness

There are four things that has made her success Possible:

  1. She had Life, because it is a right in this country
  2. She had the right of Liberty, in this country
  3. She had the right to Pursue Happiness
  4. She pursued happiness until, she acquired the “Property” of all that makes her happy

 

I found it very interesting that she had two teachers growing up that perhaps with good intentions, tried to keep her from getting hurt. Believing Lisa had little or no ability, maybe they only wanted to protect her from trying to rise beyond her ability, only to fall so low? But her English teacher told her she was the “weakest writer she had ever met in her entire life.” Her speech teacher told her, “I recommend you never speak in public…” Lisa did not blame education. In the full length video (link provided below), she explains that she attended the same conference. “42 times” because, she did not understand what they were talking about. But she kept attending until, she did understand and then she raised the money, to start her own business. Lisa Nichols, has since her “broke and broken” days, gone on to write, several best selling books and she is one of the most sought-after, motivational speakers, in the United States today. And she is a true –

 

#Portrait of an American

 

 

The above video is an almost a 4 minute edited clip from, the original. It you would like to watch the full segment (about 15 minutes) see:

Link to full segment –

https://youtu.be/aWc75TDhVOY

If you would like to know more about Lisa Nichols, her bio appears on her website –

motivatingthemasses.com

Link to her bio –

http://motivatingthemasses.com/aboutus/lisa_nichols_bio.asp#bio

 

 

1 of WE the People,

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