Archive for the ‘The Star Spangled Banner’ Category

The Quest

September 24, 2017

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By Dahni
© 2017, all rights reserved

Good Morning WE the People!😃🇺🇸

I do not generally, recommend products and services other than my own, but this one is right up my flagpole so to speak…

My flagpole May 30, 2016

…and brings a tear of joy to my eye…

Tear of Joy

With all the ‘take a knee’ during our National Anthem being played at sporting venues and the ‘everything is racist’ mentality of individuals, groups and even cities and towns, with the consequences of the attempts to change history, by the removal, defacing and destruction of public and private property, of statues and other historical artifacts, perhaps those that are protesting and all of US should actually know something about, The Constitution of this, Our Republic?

If you agree or if you would consider such, I am pleased to recommend the following family friendly and non-partisan, something for every age, board game! WE the People are family, are we not?

Constitution Quest board game

for:

◊ Birthdays
◊ Holidays
◊ Anytime
◊ Schools
◊ Groups
◊ Friends
◊ Families
◊ Any Age

Full website:

http://www.constitutionquest.com/ecommerce/constitution-quest-board-game.html

Mobile site:

http://www.constitutionquest.com/ecommerce/constitution-quest-board-game.html

Facebook:

https://m.facebook.com/ConstitutionQuest

 

1 of WE,

Dahni

Patriotic 1 of WE 🙂

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Remember

May 30, 2016
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By Dahni
© 2016, all rights reserved

Half-Mast til' Noon

Half-staff til’ Noon

Most of you know I’m not, a veteran. I’ve family that have lived and died in service to this country. Most of my dearest friends are members of these services for my Freedom and yours! They are among the kindest, gentlest, most respectful, most civil, most dedicated, most disciplined, among the smartest, and most heart-serving, self-sacrificing people, I’ve ever known! I’m just honored, really honored that they let me hang out with them and shake their hands! I try my best to do for them more! To me, they are the living, breathing examples of the purpose of, the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States of America! I REMEMBER you! And they, remember what Memorial Day is for! I will REMEMBER! What does this day mean to me and to all others?

Full-staff after Noon

Full-staff after Noon

Note: “Half-staff” or “Half-mast?” If a flag is hoisted on a pole on land, the proper term is half-staff. If it is a flag raised on a ship, the correct term is, half-mast.

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, a soldier stand guards by day and night at Arlington National Cemetery

Memorial Day, is an American holiday observed on the last Monday of May. It is supposed to, honor the men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military. Today, many people have forgotten this or have never known this and it has become something else. And sadly, there are those that do not care and may not ever care? How very sad and so very, very foolish are these whose breath and freedom has been provided by those who lived and died that they so dishonor! General Sherman of the Civil War said, “War is Hell!” Every soldier, from both the North and South, fought and died for FREEDOM, all politics aside!!

In 1966, the federal government declared Waterloo, New York, the official birthplace of Memorial Day. Waterloo—which had first celebrated the day on May 5, 1866—was chosen because it hosted an annual, community-wide event, during which businesses closed and residents decorated the graves of soldiers with flowers and flags.

Originally, this day was known as, Decoration Day. It was officially proclaimed on 5 May 1868 by General John Logan, national commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, in his General Order No. 11. “The 30th of May, 1868, is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village and hamlet churchyard in the land,” he proclaimed. The date of Decoration Day, as he called it, was chosen because it wasn’t the anniversary of any particular battle.

On the first Decoration Day, General James Garfield made a speech at Arlington National Cemetery, and 5,000 participants decorated the graves of the 20,000 Union and Confederate soldiers buried there. Soldiers still decorate the graves here, every year, for the unknown soldier and for those who families cannot or will not. It is fitting that both those of the North and of the South are buried here because, WE the People are one people! Arlington Cemetery by the way, is on property that once belonged to General Robert E. Lee. The name Lee, is a namesake in our family. Our grandmother Laura Lee was named by her great-grandfather, who fought with General Lee and respected him greatly! Our sister was named, Carol Lee. Her daughter was named, Sierra Lee.

Memorial Day became an official federal holiday in 1971.

Today, we have forgotten this history or have never been taught it. Many Americans observe Memorial Day by visiting cemeteries or memorials of their family and friends that may or may not have served in the military. Others hold family gatherings and participate in parades. Unofficially, at least, it marks the beginning of summer. Swimming pools often open up on Memorial Day and close on Labor Day. Many people just think of it as a three-day holiday. It has become a time for the gatherings of friends and family and backyard barbecues and picnics.  It is a time of ‘great deals’ for new car sales and sales for so many more ‘things.’ Then there is the matter of confusing this day with other holidays.

 

REMEMBER

VETERANS DAY

Veterans Day November 1, is an opportunity to publicly commemorate the contributions of living veterans. Every veteran has the right to a military funeral to include: an honor guard, the blowing of TAPS, their coffin draped with a flag of the United States of America and to have it properly folded by the honor guard into its triangular shape, representing the first patriots’ cocked three corner hat of 1776 and to have this presented to some loved one, “on behalf of a grateful nation.” 

ARMED FORCES DAY

Armed Forces Day, May 17 an opportunity to publicly commemorate the contributions of those presently serving in all branches of the military.

RememberMemDay3

Poem is written by -Unknown-  click to enlarge

MEMORIAL DAY

Memorial Day, May 30 (traditional), is a sacred day to all war veterans. It commemorates those who died while in service to their country or that died from wounds while in service to our country. My brother’s namesake, Richard, was an Air Force pilot in WW2. Neither his plane nor his body was every found. Memorial Day is for men and women like him. Like any veteran, these men and women have the rights to a military funeral with all the do respect, due them. America’s collective consciousness demands that all citizens be reminded of the deaths of their fellow countrymen during wartime or times of their sacrifice while in service to our nation. By honoring the nation’s war dead and those that died while in service, we preserve their memory and thus their service and sacrifice. All U.S. flags should be displayed at half-staff or half-mast during the morning hours. At noon, they should be raised back to full-staff or full-mast. Respectfully, the flag should be taken down at sunset and properly folded.

Note: “Half-staff,” Full-staff” or “Half-mast, Full-mast?” If a flag is hoisted on a pole on land, the proper term is half-staff or full-staff. If it is a flag raised on a ship, the correct term is, half-mast or full-staff.

This day is a sacred day to all veterans and to those serving. None of these never need, to be reminded of the reason that Memorial Day must be commemorated!

Far too often, the nation as a whole, takes for granted the freedoms all Americans enjoy and those that have made and will make it still possible! Those freedoms were paid for, or will be, by the ultimate sacrifice with the lives of others, few of us actually knew or will ever know. That’s why they are all collectively remembered on one special day.

Memorial Day should be regarded as a civic obligation. For this is a national debt that can only be truly repaid by individual Americans. By honoring the nation’s dead that died in service to our country, we preserve their memory and thus their service and sacrifice in the memories of future generations. For by them are we here! There is no greater example of love, commitment and dedication, for they gave and will freely give their lives to something far greater, than their own lives!

“Greater love hath no man [or woman] than this, that a man [or woman] lay down his life for his  [or theirfriends [and family and all others of our nation].”

John 15:13,King James Version (KJV)

They came; they will come, from all walks of life and regions of the country. But they all had and will have, one thing in common—love of and loyalty to country. This bond cemented and cements ties between them in times of trials, allowing a diverse lot of Americans to achieve monumental ends. They are the examples of what it means to be united, in the United States of America!

We remember the loss of loved ones, a sense of loss that takes group form. In essence, America is commemorating those who made the greatest sacrifice possible—giving one’s own life on behalf of others.

Nothing infuriates me more than the ignorance of flag burners. Not only do they not understand the purpose of Our Republic, and trample upon it, spit on it and burn it, they take these flags from those whose honor it is, to have their coffins draped by their Mother country, for whom they have freely given their all, to all and to even for those that burn their palls.

Perhaps those that disrespect, would be interested in knowing that if the government enforced our laws, they would be in violation of the U.S. Flag Code and subject to penalties. For more information on the flag code see: Flag This (an update)

Note: A pall (also called mortcloth) is a cloth (or flag) that covers a casket or coffin at funerals. The word comes from the Latin pallium (cloak).

Each year, members of the military have the honor of placing flags at the graves of every soldier buried, in Arlington National Cemetery. Soldiers understand and take this day and the words of JFK seriously. President John F. Kennedy said, “Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country”

This year marks the 72nd year since the Normandy Invasion.

RememberNormandy

Normandy Then & Now (click to enlarge)

The picture above is extraordinary! Two actual photographs were merged together to make it.  It is ‘D-Day’ in Normandy. It is the Landing of US troops on Omaha beach. The Black and white photo portion is from June 6th 1944; colour from 2010. Many lost their lives the day this was taken or shortly after. Most have since died. The rest will soon pass away. Our family honors two family friends (Joe & Don) that participated in the Normandy Invasion. They are honored to personally participate in the memorial in Normandy, France, on this seventy-second commemoration. They are just two of the few still alive from their ship, the USS DD603 Murphy, which participated in the Normandy Invasion. Though we may not know or remember those in this picture, they have all lived and died or will one day, for FREEDOM! They cannot and must not be forgotten! REMEMBER!

I am posting this with the hope that as many people as possible will see it, share it, learn from it and DO IT! Enjoy your long holiday. Enjoy your times together as family and friends. Enjoy your rest. Enjoy your barbecues, parades and picnics. I hope you find and make ‘great deals’ during this three-day weekend. Enjoy decorating the graves of your loved ones. But on Memorial Day, May the 30th, remember what it is REALLY for and for WHOM! Flags In! Flags in for their courage! Flags in for the cause! Flags in for the freedom! I will, REMEMBER!

“This weekend we honor those who gave it all to their country and then some. It amazes me often how men and women find the courage to put on the uniform and wear their patriotism freely and honorably. It also reminds me of what Nathan Hale said one time, “I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country.” The heroes of this country deserve a day to be celebrated and reflected upon, but not mourned. I conclude this post with a great quote from General George S. Patton, “It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died. Rather we should thank God that such men lived.””

excerpt from the words of a living Army veteran: Chuck Mcmillen

 

1 of We,

Dahni

The Star Spangled Banner

March 3, 2015

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Today in history

 

StarSpangledBannerIn 1814, Francis Scott Key wrote new words for a well-known drinking song, “To Anacreon in Heaven,” to celebrate America’s recent victory over the British. However, only in 1931, following a twenty-year effort during which more than forty bills and joint resolutions were introduced in Congress, was a law finally signed proclaiming “The Star Spangled Banner” to be the national anthem of the United States.

On March 3, 1961, ‘The Star Spangled Banner, became the national anthem of the United States of America. “The Star-Spangled Banner” was recognized for official use first, by the U.S. Navy in 1889 and by U.S. President Woodrow Wilson in 1916. It took a twenty-year effort during which more than forty bills and joint resolutions were introduced in Congress. Finally, it became law and the national anthem by, a congressional resolution on March 3, 1931 (46 Stat. 1508, codified at 36 U.S.C. § 301), which was signed by President Herbert Hoover.

The lyrics come from “Defence of Fort M’Henry”, a poem written in 1814 by the 35-year-old lawyer and amateur poet Francis Scott Key after witnessing the bombardment of Fort McHenry by British ships of the Royal Navy in the Chesapeake Bay during the Battle of Fort McHenry in the War of 1812.

The poem was set to the tune of a popular British ‘drinking’ song written by John Stafford Smith for the Anacreontic Society, a men’s social club in London. “To Anacreon in Heaven” (or “The Anacreontic Song”), with various lyrics, was already popular in the United States. Set to Key’s poem and renamed “The Star-Spangled Banner”, it would soon become a well-known American patriotic song.

StarSpangledBanner2

With a range of one octave and one fifth (a semitone more than an octave and a half), it is known for being difficult to sing. Although the poem has four stanzas, only the first is commonly sung today.